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All about: Alrex

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Generic Name: loteprednol ophthalmic (lo te PRED nol off THAL mik)
Brand Names: Alrex, Lotemax

What is Alrex (loteprednol ophthalmic)?

Loteprednol is in a group of drugs called corticosteroids. It prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Loteprednol ophthalmic (for the eye) is used to treat eye swelling caused by surgery, infection, allergies, and other conditions.

Loteprednol ophthalmic may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Alrex (loteprednol ophthalmic)?

Do not use this medication while you are wearing contact lenses. This medication may contain a preservative that can be absorbed by soft contact lenses. Wait at least 15 minutes after using loteprednol before putting your contact lenses in. Do not allow the dropper to touch any surface, including the eyes or hands. If the dropper becomes contaminated it could cause an infection in your eye, which can lead to vision loss or serious damage to the eye. Stop using loteprednol and call your doctor at once if you have signs of a new eye infection such as swelling, redness, irritation, or drainage, or if you have problems with your vision, or severe pain, burning, or stinging when you use the eye drops. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 2 days of treatment.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using Alrex (loteprednol ophthalmic)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to loteprednol, or if you have any type of fungal, viral, or bacterial infection of your eye.

Before using loteprednol, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • glaucoma;

  • cataracts (or if you have recently had cataract surgery); or

  • herpes infection of your eye.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use loteprednol ophthalmic, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether loteprednol ophthalmic passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use Alrex (loteprednol ophthalmic)?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label.

Do not use this medication for longer than 2 weeks unless your doctor tells you to.

Wash your hands before using the eye drops. Shake the eye drops well just before each use.

To apply the eye drops:

  • Tilt your head back slightly and pull down on the lower eyelid. Hold the dropper above the eye with the dropper tip down. Look up and away from the dropper. Squeeze out a drop and close your eye.

  • Gently press your finger to the inside corner of the eye (near the nose) for about 1 minute to keep the liquid from draining into your tear duct.

Do not allow the dropper to touch any surface, including the eyes or hands. If the dropper becomes contaminated it could cause an infection in your eye, which can lead to vision loss or serious damage to the eye.

Do not use this medication while you are wearing contact lenses. This medication may contain a preservative that can be absorbed by soft contact lenses. Wait at least 15 minutes after using loteprednol before putting your contact lenses in.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 2 days of treatment.

To be sure loteprednol is not causing harmful effects, your vision may need to be checked after using the medication for 10 days or longer. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store loteprednol ophthalmic with the cap on at room temperature, away from moisture and heat. Do not use the eye drops if the liquid changes colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medication as soon as you remember the missed dose. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and use the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

An overdose of loteprednol ophthalmic is not likely to cause life-threatening symptoms.

What should I avoid while using Alrex (loteprednol ophthalmic)?

Avoid using other medications in your eyes during treatment with loteprednol ophthalmic unless your doctor has told you to.

Alrex (loteprednol ophthalmic) side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using loteprednol and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
  • signs of a new eye infection such as swelling, redness, irritation, or drainage;

  • problems with your vision; or

  • severe pain, burning or stinging when using the eye drops.

Keep using the medication and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects:

  • minor burning when using the eye drops;

  • dry, red, itchy, or watery eyes;

  • feeling that something is in your eye;

  • being more sensitive to light;

  • headache; or

  • runny nose, sore throat.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect Alrex (loteprednol ophthalmic)?

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect loteprednol ophthalmic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has information about loteprednol ophthalmic written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Loteprednol ophthalmic is available with a prescription under the brand names Alrex and Lotemax. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.02. Revision Date: 06/01/2007 10:08:10 AM.

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