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All about: anti-inhibitor coagulant complex injectable

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Generic Name: anti-inhibitor coagulant complex (injectable) (an TEE in HIH bih tor coe AG you lant COM plex)
Brand Names: Autoplex T, Feiba VH

What is anti-inhibitor coagulant complex?

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is made up of proteins normally present in the blood that allow the blood to clot.

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is used to treat or prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia and Factor VIII inhibitors.

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex may also be used for purposes other than those listed here.

What is the most important information I should know about anti-inhibitor coagulant complex?

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain infectious agents (e.g., viruses) that can cause disease. Although anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the possibility that it carries an infectious agent, it can still potentially transmit disease. Discuss with your doctor the risks and benefits of using anti-inhibitor coagulant complex.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from anti-inhibitor coagulant complex. Parovovirus B19 may more seriously affect pregnant women and those with poor immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and pain in the belly. Dark-colored urine and yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with anti-inhibitor coagulant complex.

Carry or wear identification that will alert others that you have hemophilia or another blood clotting disorder in the case of an emergency.

Tell your doctor and dentist that you have hemophilia or another blood clotting disorder before having surgery or other invasive procedures.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using anti-inhibitor coagulant complex?

Do not use anti-inhibitor coagulant complex without first talking to your doctor if you have

  • had an unusual or allergic reaction to this medication, a similar medication, a human protein product, dyes, additives, or preservatives;
  • hardening of the arteries;
  • severe injury or infection;

  • liver disease; or
  • other bleeding or blood clotting disorders.

You may not be able to use anti-inhibitor coagulant complex or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether it will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use anti-inhibitor coagulant complex without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether anti-inhibitor coagulant complex could be harmful to a nursing baby. Do not use anti-inhibitor coagulant complex without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use anti-inhibitor coagulant complex?

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex will be administered by intravenous (into a vein) injection by a healthcare provider.

Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with anti-inhibitor coagulant complex to monitor progress and side effects.

Carry or wear identification that will alert others that you have hemophilia or another blood clotting disorder in the case of an emergency.

Your healthcare provider will store anti-inhibitor coagulant complex as directed by the manufacturer.

If you are using anti-inhibitor coagulant complex at home, your doctor or healthcare provider will give you detailed instructions on how to administer and store the medication.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Contact your doctor if a dose of anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is missed.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose of anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is suspected.

What should I avoid while using anti-inhibitor coagulant complex?

Tell your doctor and dentist that you have hemophilia or another blood clotting disorder before having surgery or other invasive procedures.

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex side effects

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is made from human plasma (part of the blood) and may contain infectious agents (e.g., viruses) that can cause disease. Although anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is screened, tested, and treated to reduce the possibility that it carries an infectious agent, it can still potentially transmit disease. Discuss with your doctor the risks and benefits of using anti-inhibitor coagulant complex.

Some viruses, such as parovovirus B19 and hepatitis A, may be more difficult to identify or remove from anti-inhibitor coagulant complex. Parovovirus B19 may more seriously affect pregnant women and those with poor immune systems. Symptoms of parovovirus B19 infection include fever, chills, runny nose, and drowsiness followed about 2 weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, and pain in the belly. Dark-colored urine and yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes may also occur. Contact your doctor if you develop any of these symptoms after treatment with anti-inhibitor coagulant complex.

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, contact your healthcare provider immediately or seek emergency medical attention:
  • an allergic reaction (shortness of breath; wheezing; tightness of the chest; closing of the throat; hives; swelling of the lips, face, or tongue; hives or rash; dizziness or fainting);

  • changes in pulse rate or blood pressure;

  • difficulty breathing, chest pain, or cough; or

  • pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to use anti-inhibitor coagulant complex and talk to your doctor if you experience

  • headache; or

  • flushing.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect anti-inhibitor coagulant complex?

Other drugs that affect bleeding or blood-clotting processes can interact with anti-inhibitor coagulant complex resulting in dangerous side effects and/or altered effectiveness. Do not take any other prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products, without first talking to your doctor during treatment with anti-inhibitor coagulant complex.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has additional information about anti-inhibitor coagulant complex written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Anti-inhibitor coagulant complex is available with a prescription under the brand names Autoplex T and FEIBA VH. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.04. Revision Date: 7/1/04 2:01:19 PM.

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