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All about: Oxytrol transdermal

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Generic Name: oxybutynin (transdermal) (ox i BYOO ti nin)
Brand Names: Oxytrol

What is oxybutynin transdermal?

Oxybutynin reduces muscle spasms of the bladder and urinary tract.

Oxybutynin transdermal is used to treat symptoms of overactive bladder, such as frequent or urgent urination, incontinence (urine leakage), and increased nighttime urination.

Oxybutynin transdermal may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about oxybutynin transdermal?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to oxybutynin, or if you have uncontrolled glaucoma, a blockage in your stomach or intestines, or if you are unable to urinate. Oxybutynin can cause blurred vision, drowsiness, or dizziness. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of oxybutynin.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Drink plenty of fluids to keep yourself hydrated while you are using oxybutynin.

Do not expose the oxybutynin transdermal patch to sunlight. It should be worn under clothing.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using oxybutynin transdermal?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to oxybutynin, or if you have:
  • untreated or uncontrolled glaucoma;

  • a blockage in your digestive tract (stomach or intestines); or

  • if you have decreased urination or are unable to urinate.

Before using oxybutynin transdermal, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • glaucoma;

  • liver disease;

  • kidney disease;

  • myasthenia gravis;

  • an enlarged prostate;

  • an intestinal disorder, such as ulcerative colitis; or

  • a stomach disorder such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or slow digestion.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use oxybutynin transdermal, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether oxybutynin transdermal passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use oxybutynin transdermal?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

To use the patch, open the sealed pouch and remove the protective liner. Apply the transdermal patch to a clean, dry area on your stomach, hip or buttock. Avoid skin that is oily, irritated, or damaged. Avoid placing the patch on a skin area that will be rubbed by a waistband or tight clothing.

Press the patch onto the skin and press it down firmly with your fingers. Make sure the patch is well sealed around the edges. When properly applied, the patch should stay on while swimming or bathing.

Leave the patch in place and wear it for 3 to 4 days. You should change the patch twice per week. Each time you apply a new patch, choose a different skin area on your stomach, hip, or buttock. Do not apply a patch to the same skin twice within one week.

Try to change your patch on the same two days each week (such as every Sunday and Thursday). There is a calendar printed on the package of this medication to help you establish a steady patch-changing schedule.

If the patch falls off, try sticking it back on. If it does not stay on, replace it with a new one and wear it until your next regular patch-changing day. Do not change your schedule, even if you apply a new patch to replace one that has fallen off.

After removing a patch, fold it in half so it sticks together and flush it down the toilet or place it in a waste can with a lid.

Use baby oil or mild soap and water to remove any adhesive residue that stays on your skin. Avoid using harsh soaps, alcohol, nail polish remover, or other solvents that could irritate your skin.

Keep the oxybutynin transdermal patch in its sealed pouch until you are ready to use it. Store the pouches at room temperature away from heat and moisture.

What happens if I miss a dose?

If you forget to change a patch on your scheduled day, remove and replace the patch as soon as you remember. Wear the patch until your next regular patch-changing day. Do not change your schedule, even if you wear the new patch for less that 3 days.

Do not apply two patches at the same time to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of an oxybutynin transdermal overdose may include restlessness, tingly feeling, fever, uneven heart rate, vomiting, and urinating less than usual or not at all.

What should I avoid while using oxybutynin transdermal?

Oxybutynin can cause blurred vision, drowsiness, or dizziness. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of oxybutynin.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Drink plenty of fluids to keep yourself hydrated while you are using oxybutynin transdermal.

Do not expose the oxybutynin transdermal transdermal patch to sunlight. It should be worn under clothing.

Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by oxybutynin transdermal.

Oxybutynin transdermal side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using oxybutynin transdermal and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
  • fever with hot, dry skin;

  • uneven heart rate;

  • pain, burning, or other difficulty when urinating; or

  • severe itching, burning, or blistering that does not clear up within several hours after removing the skin patch.

Continue using oxybutynin transdermal and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects:

  • mild skin itching, burning, redness, or discoloration where a patch was worn;

  • dizziness, drowsiness, weakness;

  • blurred vision;

  • dry mouth;

  • warmth, tingling, or redness under your skin;

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

  • constipation or diarrhea;

  • dry eyes;

  • stuffy nose;

  • back pain;

  • feeling restless; or

  • sleep problems (insomnia).

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect oxybutynin transdermal?

Before using oxybutynin transdermal, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • atropine (Donnatal, and others);

  • belladonna;

  • clidinium (Quarzan);

  • dicyclomine (Bentyl);

  • glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

  • hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others);

  • mepenzolate (Cantil);

  • methantheline (Provocholine);

  • methscopolamine (Pamine);

  • propantheline (Pro-Banthine);

  • scopolamine (Transderm-Scop);

  • antibiotics such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S., Ery-Tab, Erythrocin), itraconazole (Sporanox), or ketoconazole (Nizoral).

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use oxybutynin transdermal, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect oxybutynin transdermal. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has information about oxybutynin transdermal written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Oxybutynin transdermal is available with a prescription generically and under the brand name Oxytrol. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.02. Revision Date: 11/30/06 11:46:16 AM.

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