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All about: cabergoline

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Generic Name: cabergoline (ca BER goe leen)
Brand Names: Dostinex

What is cabergoline?

Cabergoline is in a group of drugs called dopamine receptor antagonists. It works by reducing the amount of prolactin (a hormone) that is released from the pituitary gland.

Cabergoline is used to treat a hormone imbalance in which there is too much prolactin in the blood (also called hyperprolactinemia).

Cabergoline may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about cabergoline?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to cabergoline, or if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure, pregnancy-related high blood pressure, or if you are allergic to any type of ergot medicine such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot), dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal Nasal Spray), ergonovine (Ergotrate), or methylergonovine (Methergine).

Before taking cabergoline, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver disease, heart disease, or a breathing disorder.

Cabergoline is usually taken twice each week for at least 6 months. Do not take this medication every day unless your doctor tells you to.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis to measure your prolactin levels. Your doctor may want to continue checking your prolactin levels for several months after you stop taking cabergoline. Do not miss any scheduled visits.

Tell your doctor if you are also taking metoclopramide (Reglan), blood pressure medications, diuretics, or any medication to treat a psychiatric disorder.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking cabergoline?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to cabergoline, or if you have:
  • uncontrolled high blood pressure (hypertension);

  • hypertension caused by pregnancy, including eclampsia and preeclampsia; or

  • if you are allergic to any type of ergot medicine such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Cafergot), dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal Nasal Spray), ergonovine (Ergotrate), or methylergonovine (Methergine).

Before taking cabergoline, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • liver disease;

  • heart disease; or

  • a breathing disorder.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use cabergoline, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether cabergoline passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take cabergoline?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Cabergoline is usually taken twice each week for at least 6 months. Do not take this medication every day unless your doctor tells you to.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis to measure your prolactin levels. Your doctor may want to continue checking your prolactin levels for several months after you stop taking cabergoline. Do not miss any scheduled visits.

Store cabergoline at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Symptoms of a cabergoline overdose may include stuffy nose, confusion, hallucinations, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking cabergoline?

There are no restrictions on food, beverages, or activity while using cabergoline unless your doctor has told you otherwise.

Cabergoline side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using cabergoline and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
  • cough or trouble breathing; or

  • feeling light-headed, fainting.

Keep taking cabergoline and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects:

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation;

  • headache;

  • dizziness, drowsiness, nervousness;

  • numbness or tingly feeling; or

  • hot flashes.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect cabergoline?

Before using cabergoline, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • metoclopramide (Reglan);

  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik);

  • a beta-blocker such as acebutolol (Sectral), atenolol (Tenormin), betaxolol (Kerlone), bisoprolol (Zebeta), carteolol (Cartrol), carvedilol (Coreg), esmolol (Brevibloc), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), penbutolol (Levatol), pindolol (Visken), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren);

  • a calcium channel blocker such as amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Tiazac, Cartia, Cardizem), felodipine (Plendil), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), nimodipine (Nimotop), nisoldipine (Sular), or verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan);

  • a diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), bumetanide (Bumex), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Lopressor, Vasoretic, Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zarxolyn), spironolactone (Aldactazide, Aldactone), triamterene (Dyrenium, Maxzide, Dyazide), torsemide (Demadex), and others; or

  • other blood pressure medications such as irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), olmesartan (Benicar), telmisartan (Micardis), and valsartan (Diovan).

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use cabergoline, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect cabergoline. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has information about cabergoline written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Cabergoline is available with a prescription under the brand name Dostinex. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Dostinex 0.5 mg--white capsule-shaped tablet

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.01. Revision Date: 04/12/2007 1:16:59 PM.

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