21 . September , 2018 - Friday
Check todays hot topics or new products

Find a Drug: Advanced

Please Sign in or Register

All about: Actoplus Met

Big Image

Generic Name: metformin and pioglitazone (met FOR min and py o GLI ta zone)
Brand Names: Actoplus Met

What is metformin and pioglitazone?

Metformin and pioglitazone is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels.

Metformin and pioglitazone is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes.

Metformin and pioglitazone may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about metformin and pioglitazone?

Do not use metformin and pioglitazone if you have kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

Before taking metformin and pioglitazone, tell your doctor if you have congestive heart failure or heart disease, a history of heart attack or stroke, liver disease, or eye problems caused by diabetes.

Some people have developed a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin and pioglitazone. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting.

If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you may need to temporarily stop taking metformin and pioglitazone. Be sure the surgeon knows ahead of time that you are using this medication.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them, including hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, fast heartbeat, seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Some women using metformin and pioglitazone have started having menstrual periods, even after not having a period for a long time due to a medical condition. You may be able to get pregnant if your periods restart. Talk with your doctor about the need for birth control.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin and pioglitazone?

Some people have developed a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin and pioglitazone. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting.

You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you have congestive heart failure.

Do not use metformin and pioglitazone if you have kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin).

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have:

  • congestive heart failure or heart disease;

  • a history of heart attack or stroke;

  • liver disease; or

  • eye problems caused by diabetes.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use metformin and pioglitazone, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment.

Some women using metformin and pioglitazone have started having menstrual periods, even after not having a period for a long time due to a medical condition. You may be able to get pregnant if your periods restart. Talk with your doctor about the need for birth control. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether metformin and pioglitazone passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not take metformin and pioglitazone without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Older adults may have a higher risk of developing lactic acidosis. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk.

How should I take metformin and pioglitazone?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger or smaller amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Take metformin and pioglitazone with meals.

Metformin and pioglitazone is only part of a complete program of treatment that also includes diet, exercise, and weight control. It is important to use this medicine regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested, and you may need regular eye exams. It is important that you not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Your medication needs may change if you become sick or injured, if you have a serious infection, or if you have any type of surgery. Your doctor may want you to stop taking metformin and pioglitazone for a short time if any of these situations affect you.

Take care not to let your blood sugar get too low, causing hypoglycemia. You may have hypoglycemia if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress.

Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them:
  • hunger, headache, confusion, irritability;

  • drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors;

  • sweating, fast heartbeat;

  • seizure (convulsions); or

  • fainting, coma (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal).

Always keep a source of sugar available in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar. Sugar sources include orange juice, glucose gel, candy, or milk. If you have severe hypoglycemia and cannot eat or drink, use an injection of glucagon. Your doctor can give you a prescription for a glucagon emergency injection kit and tell you how to give the injection.

Your doctor may have you take extra vitamin B12 while you are taking metformin and pioglitazone. Take only the amount of vitamin B12 that your doctor has prescribed.

If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you may need to temporarily stop taking metformin and pioglitazone. Be sure the surgeon knows ahead of time that you are using this medication.

Store metformin and pioglitazone at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember (be sure to take the medicine with food). If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. You may have signs of low blood sugar, such as hunger, headache, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, tremors, sweating, fast heartbeat, seizure (convulsions), fainting, or coma. An overdose of metformin and pioglitazone may cause a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting.

What should I avoid while taking metformin and pioglitazone?

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking metformin and pioglitazone. Alcohol lowers blood sugar and may increase the risk of lactic acidosis while you are taking this medicine.

Metformin and pioglitazone side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain, feeling light-headed, and fainting. Stop using metformin and pioglitazone and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;

  • swelling or rapid weight gain; or

  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Other less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

  • sneezing, runny nose, cough or other signs of a cold;

  • dizziness;

  • headache;

  • mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain; or

  • joint or muscle pain.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect metformin and pioglitazone?

You may be more likely to have hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) if you are taking metformin and pioglitazone with other drugs that raise blood sugar. Drugs that can raise blood sugar include:

  • isoniazid;

  • diuretics (water pills);

  • steroids (prednisone and others);

  • phenothiazines (Compazine and others);

  • thyroid medicine (Synthroid and others);

  • birth control pills and other hormones;

  • seizure medicines (Dilantin and others); and

  • diet pills or medicines to treat asthma, colds or allergies.

You may be more likely to have hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) if you are taking metformin and pioglitazone with other drugs that lower blood sugar. Drugs that can lower blood sugar include:

  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs);
  • aspirin or other salicylates (including Pepto-Bismol);

  • sulfa drugs (Bactrim and others);

  • a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI);

  • beta-blockers (Tenormin and others); or
  • probenecid (Benemid).

Some medications may interact with metformin and pioglitazone. Tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs:

  • furosemide (Lasix);

  • nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia);

  • cimetidine (Tagamet) or ranitidine (Zantac);

  • amiloride (Midamor) or triamterene (Dyrenium);

  • digoxin (Lanoxin);

  • morphine (MS Contin, Kadian, Oramorph);

  • procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl, Procanbid);

  • quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute);

  • trimethoprim (Proloprim, Primsol, Bactrim, Cotrim, Septra); or

  • vancomycin (Vancocin, Lyphocin).

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to take metformin and pioglitazone, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect metformin and pioglitazone. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has more information about metformin and pioglitazone written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Metformin and pioglitazone is available with a prescription under the brand name Actoplus Met. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Actoplus Met 15 mg/500 mg (pioglitazone/metformin)-off white oval, film-coated tablets

  • Actoplus Met 15 mg/850 mg (pioglitazone/metformin)-off white pink, oval, film-coated tablets

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.06. Revision Date: 1/14/07 3:24:28 PM.

Recent Drug Updates at DrugIndexOnline:





Cymbalta Cymbalta
Generic Name: duloxetine (du LOX e teen) Brand Names: Cymbalta What is duloxetine? Duloxetine is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs). Duloxetine affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced and cau more...

Fluorescein Sodium/Proparacaine Hydrochloride Fluorescein Sodium/Proparacaine Hydrochloride
Pronouncation: (FLURE-eh-seen SO-dee-uhm/pro-PAR-ah-cane HIGH-droe-KLOR-ide) Class: Local anesthetic Trade Names: Fluoracaine - Solution 0.5% proparacaine hydrochloride and 0.25% fluorescein sodium Mechanism of Action Pharmacology Fluorescein Diagnostic aid (corneal trauma indicator) Proparacaine S more...

Glycerin Rectal Glycerin Rectal
Some commonly used brand names are: In the U.S.— Bisco-Lax 1 Ceo-Two 5 Dacodyl 1 Deficol 1 Dulcolax 1 Fleet Babylax 3 Fleet Bisacodyl 1 Fleet Enema 7 Fleet Enema for Children 7 Fleet Enema Mineral Oil 4 Fleet Glycerin Laxative 3 Fleet Laxative 1 Sani-Supp 3 Senokot 6 Theralax 1 Therevac P more...

Interferon Alfa-2b Solution Interferon Alfa-2b Solution
Generic Name: Interferon Alfa-2b Injection Solution (in-ter-FEER-on AL-fuh) Brand Name: Intron-AInterferon Alfa-2b Solution can cause or worsen some serious medical conditions, including psychiatric conditions (eg, depression), immune system problems (autoimmune conditions such as lupus or rheum more...

Metformin Metformin
Some commonly used brand names are: In the U.S.— Glucophage Glucophage XR Glumetza In Canada— Apo-Metformin Gen-Metformin Glucophage Glycon Novo-Metformin Nu-Metformin Category Antihyperglycemic agent Description Metformin (met-FOR-min) is used to treat a type of diabetes more...

Oxymorphone Hydrochloride Oxymorphone Hydrochloride
Pronouncation: (OX-i-MOR-fone HYE-droe-KLOR-ide) Class: Opioid analgesic Trade Names: Numorphan - Injection 1 mg/mL Trade Names: Opana - Tablets 5 mg - Tablets 10 mg - Injection 1 mg/mL Trade Names: Opana ER - Tablets, extended-release 5 mg - Tablets, extended-release 10 mg - Tablets, extended-rele more...

PMS Perphenazine PMS Perphenazine
Some commonly used brand names are: In the U.S.— Chlorpromazine Hydrochloride Intensol 1 Compazine 8 Compazine Spansule 8 Mellaril 11 Mellaril Concentrate 11 Mellaril-S 11 Permitil 2 Permitil Concentrate 2 Prolixin 2 Prolixin Concentrate 2 Prolixin Decanoate 2 Prolixin Enanthate 2 Serenti more...

PREVACID NapraPAC 375 PREVACID NapraPAC 375
Generic Name: lansoprazole and naproxen (lan SOE pra zole and na PROX en) Brand Names: PREVACID NapraPAC 375, PREVACID NapraPAC 500 What is PREVACID NapraPAC 375 (lansoprazole and naproxen)? Naproxen is in a group of drugs called NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). It wo more...