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All about: Ceclor CD

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Generic Name: cefaclor (SEF a klor)
Brand Names: Ceclor, Ceclor CD, Ceclor Pulvules, Raniclor

What is Ceclor CD (cefaclor)?

Cefaclor is an antibiotic in a class of drugs called cephalosporins. Cefaclor fights bacteria in the body.

Cefaclor is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections such as bronchitis, tonsillitis, ear infections, skin infections, and urinary tract infections.

Cefaclor may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about Ceclor CD (cefaclor)?

Take all of the cefaclor that has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated.

The regular-release Ceclor capsules and suspension can be taken on an empty stomach or with food or milk if it causes stomach upset.

The extended-release Ceclor CD tablets should be taken with food.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Ceclor CD (cefaclor)?

Do not take cefaclor if you have ever had an allergic reaction to another cephalosporin or to a penicillin unless your doctor is aware of the allergy and monitors your therapy.

Before taking cefaclor, tell your doctor if you have

  • kidney disease, or
  • a gastrointestinal (digestive) disease such as colitis.

You may not be able to take cefaclor, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have either of the conditions listed above.

The Ceclor suspension contains sucrose. Individuals with diabetes may need to be aware of the sucrose contained in this suspension.

Cefaclor is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is unlikely to be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not, however, take cefaclor without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Cefaclor passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing infant. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Ceclor CD (cefaclor)?

Take this medication exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

The regular-release Ceclor capsules and suspension can be taken on an empty stomach or with food or milk if it causes stomach upset.

The extended-release Ceclor CD tablets should be taken with food. Do not take antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum (e.g., Rolaids, Maalox, Mylanta, Milk of Magnesia, and others) within one hour of a dose of Ceclor CD (extended-release cefaclor). These antacids may decrease the effects of the medication. Shake the liquid form of cefaclor well before measuring a dose. To ensure that you get a correct dose, measure the suspension with a dose-measuring spoon or cup, not a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one. Do not cut, crush, or chew the extended-release Ceclor CD tablets. They are specially formulated to release the medication slowly in the body.

Take cefaclor at evenly spaced intervals to keep a constant level of drug in the body. It is important to take cefaclor regularly to get the most benefit.

Take all of the cefaclor that has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Store the tablets and capsules at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Store the suspension in the refrigerator. Throw away any unused medication after 14 days.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember, then try to evenly space the rest of the doses for that day until you can return to a normal schedule. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

Symptoms of a cefaclor overdose may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, seizures, and muscle spasms.

What should I avoid while taking Ceclor CD (cefaclor)?

Do not take antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum (e.g., Rolaids, Maalox, Mylanta, Milk of Magnesia, and others) within one hour of a dose of Ceclor CD (extended-release cefaclor). These antacids may decrease the effects of the medication.

Ceclor CD (cefaclor) side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking cefaclor and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:
  • an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, face, or tongue; hives; or a rash);

  • rash, redness, or itching;

  • severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea;

  • mucous or blood in the stool; or

  • unusual bleeding or bruising.

Other, less serious side effects may also occur. Continue to take the medication and talk to your doctor if you experience

  • mild nausea or diarrhea, or

  • yeast infection of the mouth or vagina.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect Ceclor CD (cefaclor)?

Do not take antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum (e.g., Rolaids, Maalox, Mylanta, Milk of Magnesia, and others) within one hour of a dose of Ceclor CD (extended-release cefaclor). These antacids may decrease the effects of the medication.

Before taking cefaclor, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines

  • probenecid (Benemid);

  • a loop diuretic (water pill) such as furosemide, bumetanide (Bumex), torsemide (Demadex), or ethacrynic acid (Edecrin);

  • warfarin (Coumadin); or

  • another antibiotic.

You may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with cefaclor. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has additional information about cefaclor written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Cefaclor is available with a prescription under the brand names Ceclor and Ceclor CD. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Ceclor 250 mg--purple/white capsules

  • Ceclor 500 mg--purple/gray capsules

  • Ceclor suspension 125 mg per 5 mL (1 teaspoon) - strawberry flavor

  • Ceclor Suspension 187 mg per 5 mL (1 teaspoon)-- strawberry flavor

  • Ceclor Suspension 250 mg per 5 mL (1 teaspoon) - strawberry flavor

  • Ceclor Suspension 375 mg per 5 mL (1 teaspoon)-- strawberry flavor

  • Ceclor CD 375 mg-blue tablets

  • Ceclor CD 500 mg-blue tablets

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.05. Revision Date: 8/10/04 10:28:11 AM.

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