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All about: diclofenac and misoprostol

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Generic Name: diclofenac and misoprostol (dye KLOE fen ak and mye so PROST ole)
Brand Names: Arthrotec

What is diclofenac and misoprostol?

Diclofenac is in a group of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Misoprostol reduces stomach acid and replaces protective substances in the stomach that are reduced by NSAIDs.

The combination of diclofenac and misoprostol is used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in people at high risk for developing stomach or intestinal ulcers.

Diclofenac and misoprostol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about diclofenac and misoprostol?

Misoprostol can cause birth defects, miscarriage, premature labor, or rupture of the uterus if the medication is taken during pregnancy. Diclofenac can cause birth defects if it is taken during the last 3 months of pregnancy. Do not use diclofenac and misoprostol if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication.

This medicine can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you use diclofenac. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Seek emergency medical help if you have symptoms of heart or circulation problems, such as chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, or problems with vision or balance.

This medicine can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking diclofenac. Older adults may have an even greater risk of these serious gastrointestinal side effects.

Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms of bleeding in your stomach or intestines. This includes black, bloody, or tarry stools, or coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Many medicines available over the counter contain aspirin or other medicines similar to diclofenac (such as ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen). If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of this type of medication. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen. Do not drink alcohol while taking diclofenac and misoprostol. Alcohol can increase the risk of stomach bleeding caused by diclofenac. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Diclofenac can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking diclofenac and misoprostol?

Taking an NSAID can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke. This risk will increase the longer you use an NSAID. Do not use this medicine just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

NSAIDs can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking an NSAID. Older adults may have an even greater risk of these serious gastrointestinal side effects.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to diclofenac (Cataflam) or misoprostol (Cytotec), or if you have a history of allergic reaction to aspirin or other NSAIDs.

Before taking diclofenac and misoprostol, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;

  • heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure;

  • a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;

  • liver or kidney disease,
  • asthma;

  • polyps in your nose;

  • porphyria;

  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;

  • if you smoke; or

  • drink more than three alcoholic beverages a day.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use diclofenac, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment.

FDA pregnancy category X. Misoprostol can cause birth defects, miscarriage, premature labor, or rupture of the uterus if the medication is taken during pregnancy. Diclofenac can cause birth defects if it is taken during the last 3 months of pregnancy. Do not use diclofenac and misoprostol if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication. You will need to have a pregnancy test within 2 weeks before you start taking diclofenac and misoprostol. Diclofenac and misoprostol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take diclofenac and misoprostol?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water. Swallow the diclofenac and misoprostol tablet whole. Do not crush, break, or chew the pill. Take diclofenac and misoprostol with food or milk to lessen stomach upset. Do not share this medication with anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms you have. Store diclofenac and misoprostol at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. Symptoms of a diclofenac overdose may include drowsiness, confusion, muscle weakness, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, shallow breathing, feeling light-headed, or fainting.

What should I avoid while taking diclofenac and misoprostol?

Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice. Use only the specific type of antacid your doctor recommends. Antacids contain different medicines and some types can make it harder for your body to absorb diclofenac and misoprostol.

Do not use any other over-the-counter cold, allergy, or pain medication without first asking your doctor or pharmacist. Many medicines available over the counter contain aspirin or other medicines similar to diclofenac (such as ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen). If you take certain products together you may accidentally take too much of this type of medication. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains aspirin, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, or naproxen. Do not drink alcohol while taking diclofenac and misoprostol. Alcohol can increase the risk of stomach bleeding caused by diclofenac. Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. Diclofenac may increase the sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when exposure to the sun is unavoidable.

Diclofenac and misoprostol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and seek medical attention or call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
  • chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance;

  • black, bloody, or tarry stools;

  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;

  • swelling or rapid weight gain;

  • urinating less than usual or not at all;

  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure);

  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;

  • bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or

  • fever with headache, neck stiffness, chills, increased sensitivity to light, purple spots on the skin, and/or seizure (convulsions).

Keep taking the medication and talk with your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects:

  • mild stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, bloating, gas;

  • dizziness, drowsiness, headache;

  • blurred vision, ringing in your ears; or

  • unusual vaginal bleeding.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect diclofenac and misoprostol?

Before taking diclofenac and misoprostol, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin);

  • cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune);

  • digoxin (Lanoxin);

  • diuretics (water pills) such as furosemide (Lasix);

  • insulin or diabetes medicine you take by mouth;

  • lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid);

  • methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall);

  • phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton);

  • steroids (prednisone and others);

  • tacrolimus (Prograf);

  • aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others; or

  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), ramipril (Altace), and others.

If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use diclofenac and misoprostol, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment.

There may be other drugs not listed that can affect diclofenac and misoprostol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has information about diclofenac and misoprostol written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Diclofenac and misoprostol is available with a prescription under the brand name Arthrotec. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Arthrotec 50 mg/200 mcg--round, white tablets

  • Arthrotec 75 mg/200 mcg-round, white tablets

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.08. Revision Date: 04/25/2007 11:11:06 AM.

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