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All about: enoxacin

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Generic Name: enoxacin (ee NOX ah sin)
Brand Names: Penetrex

What is enoxacin?

Enoxacin is an antibiotic in a class of drugs called fluoroquinolones. It fights bacteria in the body.

Enoxacin is used to treat various bacterial infections, such as gonorrhea and urinary tract infections.

Enoxacin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about enoxacin?

Take all of the enoxacin that has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Drink plenty of extra fluids every day while taking enoxacin. Take enoxacin on an empty stomach 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals. Do not take antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum (e.g., Tums or Rolaids), the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate), or vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc for a minimum of 8 hours before or 2 hours after a dose of enoxacin. Taking antacids, sucralfate, or vitamin or mineral supplements too close to a dose of enoxacin can greatly decrease the effects of the antibiotic.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking enoxacin?

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. You may not be able to take enoxacin, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during your treatment.

Enoxacin may increase the risk of seizures if you have a seizure disease.

Enoxacin is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether it will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. It is not whether enoxacin passes into breast milk. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Children younger than 12 years of age should not take enoxacin because it may interfere with bone development.

How should I take enoxacin?

Take enoxacin exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. Take enoxacin with a full glass of water (8 ounces). Drink several extra glasses of fluid each day to prevent enoxacin crystals from forming in your urine. Take enoxacin on an empty stomach 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals.

Take enoxacin at evenly spaced intervals. It is usually taken twice daily. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Do not take antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum (e.g., Tums or Rolaids), the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate), or vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc for a minimum of 8 hours before or 2 hours after a dose of enoxacin. Taking antacids, sucralfate, or vitamin or mineral supplements too close to a dose of enoxacin can greatly decrease the effects of the antibiotic. Take all of the enoxacin that has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose up to 2 hours late. If more than 2 hours have passed since the missed dose, skip it and take the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.

The most common symptom of a enoxacin overdose is seizures.

What should I avoid while taking enoxacin?

Avoid excessive exposure to sunlight. Enoxacin increases the sensitivity of the skin to sunlight, and a severe sunburn may result. Wear protective clothing and sunscreen if sun exposure is unavoidable. Call your doctor if you experience severe burning, redness, swelling, blistering, itching, or a rash after exposure to sunlight. Avoid excessive intake of caffeine-containing products such as coffee, tea, colas, and chocolate. Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Enoxacin may cause dizziness. If you experience dizziness, avoid these activities.

Enoxacin side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking enoxacin and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:
  • an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

  • seizures;

  • confusion or hallucinations;

  • liver damage (yellowing of the skin or eyes, nausea, abdominal pain or discomfort, unusual bleeding or bruising, severe fatigue); or

  • muscle or joint pain.

If you experience any of the following less serious side effects, continue taking enoxacin and talk to your doctor:

  • nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea;

  • headache, lightheadedness, or drowsiness;

  • ringing in your ears; or

  • increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect enoxacin?

Do not take antacids that contain magnesium or aluminum (e.g., Tums or Rolaids), the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate), or vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc for a minimum of 8 hours before or 2 hours after a dose of enoxacin. Taking antacids, sucralfate, or vitamin or mineral supplements too close to a dose of enoxacin can greatly decrease the effects of the antibiotic.

Before taking enoxacin, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

  • bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol);

  • theophylline (Theo-Dur, Theolair, Slo-Phyllin, Slo-Bid, Elixophyllin);

  • digoxin (Lanoxin);

  • warfarin (Coumadin);

  • probenecid (Benemid);

  • insulin or an oral diabetes medication such as glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Micronase, Diabeta, Glynase), and others;

  • a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, others), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Anaprox), ketoprofen (Orudis KT, Orudis, Oruvail), and others; or

  • cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune).

You may not be able to take enoxacin, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with enoxacin. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist has additional information about enoxacin written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Enoxacin is available with a prescription under the brand name Penetrex. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Penetrex 200 mg--capsule-shaped, light-blue, film-coated tablets

  • Penetrex 400 mg--capsule-shaped, dark-blue, film-coated tablets

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.
Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 5.04. Revision Date: 2/13/04 3:58:13 PM.

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